THE SENSES & SOCIETY 7(2): SENSORY AESTHETICS

Editors: Jim Drobnick and Jennifer Fisher

Print ISSN: 1745-8927
Online ISSN: 1745-8935
http://www.ingentaconnect.com
 

As much as it is true that an interest in sensory aesthetics is now blossoming internationally, the hypothesis of a “sensory turn” in the visual arts to account for this phenomenon is something of a misnomer. The full spectrum of experience in the visual arts has always been multi-sensory, both in production and reception. The question is how to theorize this state. The tendency to prioritize the visual over other sensory modes can be attributed to the persistent ideology of modernist aesthetics during the last half-century. While modernism offered a compelling theory for the development of abstract art from the mid-nineteenth through mid-twentieth century, its interpretative framework achieved this by reducing the estimation of many sensorially complex artworks to purely formalist exercises. The reifying ideology of modernism, however, never held sway with many artists, who continued experimentation with non-visual media. The contributions to this special issue of The Senses and Society implicitly confront modernism’s ocularcentric legacy, and examine “art” in the broad aesthetic sense so as to encompass the technologies of sensory perception pertaining to restaurants, haute cuisine, fashion and architecture.

CONTENTS

JIM DROBNICK AND JENNIFER FISHER
Introduction 

MITCHELL DAVIS
A Time and a Place for a Peach: Taste Trends in Contemporary Cooking

JENNIFER FISHER
Proprioceptive Friction: Waiting in Line to Sit with Marina Abramovic

LISA MYERS
Serving It Up: Recipes, Art and Indigenous Perspectives

JIM DROBNICK                              
Towards an Olfactory Art History: The Mingled, Fatal and Rejuvenating Perfumes of Paul Gauguin

MARK CLINTBERG           
Gut Feeling: Artists’ Restaurants and Gustatory Aesthetics

CARO VERBEEK     
Prière de toucher! Tactilism in Early Modern and Contemporary Art

JOHN POTVIN        
The Emporium of the Senses and Multi-label Retailing: The Case of Armani/Ginza

ELENI IKONIADOU           
A Rhythmic Time for the Digital (published in 7:3)

Cover image: Marina Abramovic, The Artist Is Present (2010), still from performance, 75 days, at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo: Marco Anelli, © Marina Abramovic, courtesy of the Marina Abramovic Archives and Sean Kelly Gallery, New York.